Medieval Latin Reading Practice: 3 Books

If you've had about two years of Latin, either with a Classical focus or of course especially with an Ecclesiastical Latin focus, you will enjoy working your way through these actual, genuine Medieval texts in Latin linked below. Hugh of Fouilloy's 'Aviarum/De Avibus' The Medieval Book of Birds: Hugh of Fouilloy's 'Aviarum' Edition, Translation, and... Continue Reading →

TLM Sunday Gospels, Color-Coded (in Progress)

All those busy Latin nouns out there, doing their jobs, using their endings, are often hard to keep track of all at once. To help show the various jobs nouns, pronouns, and adjectives are doing in each phrase, clause, and sentence, I assign a color to each case to visually reinforce what the specific case endings are telling us.

VTF: Mediaeval Latin, K.P. Harrington

It's another anthology that should be very useful to Church Latinists. The short introduction is excellent: a helpful summary of Church Latin's history, vocabulary, forms, syntax, and metric. Each author has a paragraph or two of interesting introductory material, and lots of photographs and reproductions of art and artifacts are nicely tucked in throughout.

If You Must Wheelock…

This really is a nice book: sentences and selections are arranged according to the chapter of Wheelock's Latin, going along with the pace of the textbook's difficulty and introduction of vocabulary.

Love Church Latin: 6 Quotes

It was Classical Latin I learned in High School. It was also Classical Latin that I took in college. Yet in the last few years I have really come to appreciate the fascinating, challenging, and special thing that Church Latin is. I wish there were more concentration on this in schools and colleges! Church Latin... Continue Reading →

Why It Is “Church Latin”

"Church Latin" is the informal, snappier-sounding term for the more scholarly phrase Ecclesiastical Latin, or the occasionally-used Medieval Latin. All of these terms are used to denote something different from "Classical Latin"--the Latin used by, say, Julius Caesar. Church Latin was (and is!) the Latin used by the Catholic Church for two thousand years--thus, where... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑