Conquer Latin: 3 Tips

St. Catherine Catholic Culture Center

Carpe diem! Now is the time…get ready to remember more, do better at your practice sentences, and even like your Latin studies.

How? With clever use of strategies and tools, of course! Organize your mind and your material, deeply encode new concepts, and actively use the vocabulary, word parts, and rules that you learn. These three things will make you master your current lessons.

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#1: Create a Memory System

With a highly-inflected language, you are going to need to intensely organize your memory. Take learning nouns, for example: you’re going to have to remember the Latin word, its pertinent meaning(s), and also gender, declension, and stem for each noun. This kind of thing is impossible without creating a memory system.

At a bare minimum:

  • Take notes/make notes in color. Nouns in Latin are pesky things. They come in three different genders–masculine, feminine, and neuter. And often there is absolutely…

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For Those Pesky Little Latin Words…

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