Church Latin Links Master List

All over this blog by now are many links: scans of good old Church Latin books, interesting websites, printables, recommended resources, and more. These links are tucked away in the dozens and dozen of posts on this blog. And since sometimes I update old posts months later with related new finds, even if you have read every post here from the beginning, you may find something you hadn’t seen in the below new list! (Golly, it’s about time somebody rounded up and corralled all this stuff!)

Background Knowledge

Textbooks (Lessons)

Textbooks Reviewed Here:
A Few Lessons I Wrote:

Sacred Music

Traditional Latin Mass Things

Here Because of the Latin Mass? (post)

The Meanings and Derivations of Familiar Catholic Terms (post) (added 4/13/21)

Latin Pronounced for Altar Boys by Rev. Edward J. Murphy (1915) (added 5/2/21)

Latin Pronounced for Singing: High Mass by Rev. Edward J. Murphy (1915) Also: Hymns for Lent, Requiem Mass, and Complete Vespers for Feasts of the BVM (added 5/2/21)

Readers & Things to Read





Other Great Books

Found in Latin Primer: A First Book of Latin for Boys and Girls, p. 128

More Late Latin Natural Method Books

A new Latin primer by Mima Maxey and Marjorie Fay (1930). Elementary grades, Natural Method, adorable illustrations!

Carolus et Maria by Marjorie Fay (1935). Reader, also elementary grades, Natural Method, same illustrator as title above

Latin primer : a first book of Latin for boys and girls (1870) by Joseph Henry Allen. Inductive reading practice with grammar explanations, based on retellings of the Old Testament, English nursery rhymes, and medieval hymns and history! (Added 3/30/21)

Palaestra; being the primer of the Tusculan system of learning, and of teaching Latin to speak; for class use and for self-instruction by “Arcadius Avellanus”, pseudonym of A. Mogyoróssy (1911). All I can say about this book and its author is, “Holy Mackerel!”

#1 A new, practical, and easy method of learning the Latin language : after the system of F. Ahn, First course by A. H. Monteith, Franz Ahn (And here is the Book 1 Answer Key) (added 4/18/21)

#2 A new, practical, and easy method of learning the Latin language: after the system of F. Ahn, Second course by A. H. Monteith, Franz Ahn (And here is the Book 2 Answer Key) (added 4/18/21)

Latin without Tears : or One Word a Day by Favell Lee Mortimer (1876) (added 7/1/21)

Natural Method & Grammar/Translation Method HYBRIDS

Grammar Info

Mnemonics & Memory Work

Amusements

Free Printables

Latin & Children

  • (Bossy Latin and Easy Memory Work printables above, too!)
My Miscellany
Other Websites

I will keep updating this list as time goes on. Do send me recommendations when you find good stuff! I will be very glad to make this an ever-more-complete resource. Ad discendam Latinam!

10 thoughts on “Church Latin Links Master List

Add yours

  1. Thank you for all you are sharing. I have a question. I have Latin by The Natural Method. I have Lingua Latina. I just downloaded The Tusculum System. That’s not all. Do I continue using all these resources at the same time or focus on just one? Which course would you recommend? I’m on lesson 10 of The Natural Method and doing well. Thank you! ________________________________

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    1. Hi! Yes, keep on with Latin by the Natural Method, with steady regular practice each week, and stay super-committed to that. It is 1) a complete program, and 2) it is Church Latin/Late Latin. “Lingua Latina” is a complete course with both books, but for Classical Latin, not Church Latin, and the Palaestra book, while Church Latin, is not complete (see the typed note by the author at the very back of that book scan for why!).

      So I recommend that everyone complete LNM, but–if you want to use those others alongside, see them as extra, for fun–and make sure you keep on going with LNM most days!

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      1. Actually, Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata has some excerpts of the Clementine Vulgate, specifically the Gospels.

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  2. LT:

    Grammaticus Magistrae Stella salutem plurimam dicit,

    Gratias tibi ad hos libros idoneos nobis distribuendos. Rogandum mihi est. Scisne ubi totum librum modo “.pdf” a Patre Paulo Distler depromam? Non possum in nexu “Hathi Trust”, sed tantum depromam vellicatim (aut “paginatim” si audeam vocabulum novum comminisci).

    Gratias iterum et Deus te benedicat!

    —Thomas

    AN:

    Hi Magistra,

    Thanks for sharing these great resources! I had a question. Do you know where I could download the entire book by Fr. Paul Distler? I am not able to on the “Hathi Trust” website/link, but I can only download it piecemeal…

    Thanks again and God Bless

    —Tom

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    1. Eheu! Hathitrust is the only place I have ever found Fr. Distler’s textbooks, and it requires a membership for access to downloads. Print copies of the textbooks apparently are unobtainable also nowadays. I did buy a reprint of “Teach the Latin, I Pray You” a couple months ago and it is worth its weight in gold.
      Thank you so much for stopping by!

      Like

  3. Also, one last quick thing in English. The Doderlein Thesaurus you link to also has an online version at https://www.latinitium.com/latin-dictionaries. It’s an immensely helpful resource as you can select English to Latin and see the entire entry, as well as just search synonyms or all of the above!

    I also didn’t see logeion.uchicago.edu in your dictionaries post. I like it because it will search multiple dictionaries at once (like Latinitium above!), and include quotes from authors showing usage through Late Antiquity (I’ve seen Boethius and Augustine in there).

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